Radon Gas Testing

You cannot see, smell or taste radon; but it may be a problem in your home.

Although radon is a naturally occurring gas in our environment, it is a cancer-causing, radioactive gas, and the second leading cause of lung cancer deaths in the U.S., according to the U.S. Surgeon General.

Testing is the only way to find out what your home’s radon level is.

Let me test your home for radon.

What are the dangers of radon?
EPA estimates that about 20,000 lung cancer deaths each year in the U.S. are radon-related. Exposure to radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. Lung cancer is the only known effect on human health from exposure to radon in air. For smokers the risk of lung cancer is significant due to the synergistic effects of radon and smoking. For this population about 62 people in a 1,000 will die of lung-cancer, compared to 7.3 people in a 1,000 for never smokers.

You cannot predict your home’s radon level based on state or local radon measurements or on test results taken in other homes in your neighborhood. Testing is the only way to find out what your home’s radon level is. I use special interference-proof continuous monitors that can measure the radon levels in different areas of the house. These measurements are taken for a brief and limited time, which may be especially important if you are buying or selling the home.

Nearly one out of every 15 homes is estimated to have elevated radon levels. The Surgeon General and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommend testing all houses. Millions of Americans have already had their homes tested for radon, and you should, too.

Where is radon found and how does it get into your home?
Radon in air is ubiquitous. Radon is found in outdoor air and in the indoor air of buildings of all kinds.It typically moves up through the ground to the air above and into your home through cracks and other holes in the foundation. Your home traps radon inside, where it can build up. Any home may have a radon problem. This means new and old homes, well-sealed and drafty homes, and homes with or without basements. Radon from soil gas is the main cause of radon problems. Sometimes radon enters the home through well water.

What are acceptable levels of radon?
EPA recommends homes be fixed if the radon level is 4 pCi/L (picocuries per liter) or more. Because there is no known safe level of exposure to radon, EPA also recommends that Americans consider fixing their home for radon levels between 2 pCi/L and 4 pCi/L. The average radon concentration in the indoor air of America’s homes is about 1.3 pCi/L. It is upon this level that EPA based its estimate of 20,000 radon-related lung cancers a year upon. It is for this simple reason that EPA recommends that Americans consider fixing their homes when the radon level is between 2 pCi/L and 4 pCi/L. The average concentration of radon in outdoor air is .4 pCi/L or 1/10th of EPA’s 4 pCi/L action level.

You can fix a radon problem.
If your home has high radon levels, there are ways to fix it. Even very high levels can be reduced to acceptable and healthier levels. I can help you explore your options of radon mitigation systems and explain how they work.

December 7, 2017